Back Results for: Faculty

Flora Cassen talks with Joe Madison about racist, anti-Semitic coronavirus conspiracy theories

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Flora Cassen talked with Joe Madison on his Sirius XM radio show.

Flora Cassen in Haaretz: White Supremacists’ Dangerous New Conspiracy Theory

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Flora Cassen writes an opinion piece published in Haaretz saying that as the COVID-19 pandemic has spread around the world the dark web has filled with conspiracy theories accusing Jews of triggering it.

The Career of a Medieval Accusation in an Age of Science

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Bedlam in the New World: A Mexican Madhouse in the Age of Enlightenment

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A rebellious Indian proclaiming noble ancestry and entitlement; a military lieutenant foreshadowing the coming of revolution; a blasphemous, Creole embroiderer in possession of a notebook filled with pornographic content. These individuals all shared one thing in common. During the late 18th century, they were deemed to be mad and were forcefully admitted to the Hospital de San Hipólito in Mexico City, the first hospital of the Americas to specialize in the care and confinement of the mentally disturbed. In her current book-in-progress, “Bedlam in the New World,” Faculty Fellow and historian of medicine Christina Ramos reconstructs the hospital’s history, as well as the lives of some of its most notorious patients who fell afoul of the Inquisition and secular criminal courts, to write a new history of madness during the Age of Enlightenment.

Sowande' Mustakeen and Douglas Flowe in Vox: 6 myths about the history of Black people in America

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Anika Walke on The Heat: 75th Anniversary of the Liberation of Auschwitz

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Christine Johnson in the Washington Post: Trump’s impeachment trial is no witch hunt

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Early modern witch hunts more resembled the regular criminal justice system, which blames marginalized groups for social ills, observes Johnson.

Professor Sowande' Mustakeem receives the Dred Scott Freedom Award

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The Dred Scott Heritage Foundation has named AFAS and History Professor Sowande' Mustakeem the recipient of its 2020 Dred Scott Freedom Award for her multiple award winning book Slavery at Sea.

Krister Knapp interviewed on KMOV about how tension with Iran impacts everyone

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Elizabeth Borgwardt in Politco on the way historians will remember the 2010s

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Elizabeth Borgwardt, associate professor of history and law, was one of the historians asked by Politico to write the paragraph that they think will describe the 2010s in American history books written a century from now.

The City Electric: How Mexico City’s People Shaped Its Electrified Future

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We inhabit electrified spaces. Utility posts and aerial and underground cables surround us. Our horizon is broken down by high voltage towers, transformers, posts and power lines. In her current book-in-progress, “Electrifying Mexico,” Faculty Fellow and historian of modern Latin America Diana Montaño delves into the making of electrified spaces in Mexico City. Her work looks at how ordinary citizens (businessmen, salespersons, inventors, doctors, housewives, maids, and domestic advisors) saw themselves and their city as modern through electricity. Here, she previews how people and power shaped Mexico City’s fate.

The Fall of the Berlin Wall and the Political Movement Overlooked by 30th Anniversary Celebrations

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The Fall of the Berlin Wall on November 9, 1989 is remembered as the inevitable triumph over socialism and the inevitable rejoining of East and West Germany. But just days earlier, up to 500,000 East Germans demonstrated in Alexanderplatz public square to appeal for changes within their government — reunification was not among their demands. In the aftermath of the wall’s fall, writes historian Anika Walke, their vision for the future of the German Democratic Republic is often forgotten.

Welcome to WashU: Flora Cassen

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Historian Flora Cassen shares some of her ongoing projects and her thoughts on the role of historical scholarship in discussions of modern-day antisemitism.

Defining ‘concentration camps’

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When Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) accused the Trump administration of “running concentration camps on our southern border,” a political firestorm erupted. But a question remained. Was the comparison justified? Holocaust historian Anika Walke sorts through the controversy.

Omitted History

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In his research, historian Douglas Flowe brings to light the convergence of historical factors that made illegality a form of resistance for African American men in early twentieth-century New York City. Diving deep into their stories — told via intake forms, health and psychological records, and personal letters and correspondence — he removes judgment and instead attempts to understand an understudied history.